Quyết định 3733/2002/QD-BYT

Decision No. 3733/2002/QD-BYT of October 10, 2002 promulgating 21 labor hygiene standards, 05 principles and 07 labor hygiene measurements

Nội dung toàn văn Decision No. 3733/2002/QD-BYT promulgating 21 labor hygiene standards


THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH
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THE SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM
Independence - Freedom - Happiness

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No. 3733/2002/QD-BYT

Hanoi, October 10, 2002

 

DECISION

PROMULGATING 21 LABOR HYGIENE STANDARDS, 05 PRINCIPLES AND 07 LABOR HYGIENE MEASUREMENTS

THE MINISTER OF HEALTH

Pursuant to the Law on People’s health protection

Pursuant to the Government's Decree No. 68/CP of October 11, 1993 on defining the functions, tasks, powers and organizational structure of the Ministry of Health;

Upon obtaining the consent of the Ministry of Labor, War Invalids and Social Affairs in the Official Dispatch No. 941/LDTBXH-BHLD of April 02, 2002; Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry in the Official Dispatch No. 0850/PTM-VPGC of April 17, 2002.

At the proposal of the Director of Defensive Medicine Department – the Ministry of Health

DECIDES:

Article 1. Promulgating together with this Decision:

1. Twenty one (21) Standards of labor hygiene applicable to facilities that employ workers.

2. Five (05)  principles and seven (07) measurements of labor hygiene being fundamental guidance for establishing working systems and positions, working machinery and tools, labor classification.

Article 2. This Decision takes effect after 15 days as from its promulgation. The provisions on labor hygiene from section 1 to section 8 in the fourth part “Provisions on labor hygiene” in the Decision No. 505-BYT/QD on April 13, 1992 of The Minister of Health on promulgating a number of Temporary hygiene standards are abolished.

Article 3. The Director of Defensive Medicine Department is responsible to organize, direct and inspect the implementation of this Decision.

Article 4. the Chief officers, the Chief Inspector, the Director of Defensive Medicine Department – the Ministry of Health, Heads of units affiliated to the Ministry of Health, the Directors of the Services of Health of central-affiliated cities and provinces are responsible to implement this Decision.

 

 

FOR THE MINISTER OF HEALTH
DEPUTY MINISTER




Nguyen Van Thuong

 

TWENTY ONE (21) STANDARDS, FIVE (05) PRINCIPLES AND SEVEN (07) MEASUREMENTS OF LABOR HYGIENE

(Promulgated together with the Decision No. 3733/2002/QD-BYT of The Minister of Health on October 10. 2002)

Part 1: Twenty one (21) standards of labor hygiene

1. Standards of hygienic amenities

2. Standards of hygienic distance

3. Manual labor – Standards of task classification by energy consumption

4. Manual labor – Standards of task classification by heart rate

5. Carrying standard – Limited weight

6. Standards of lighting

7. Standards of microclimate

8. Standards of silicon dust

9. Standards of non-silicon dust

10. Standards of cotton dust

11. Standards of asbestos dust

12. Standards of noise

13. Standards of vibration

14. Standards of static magnetic field - Magnetic flux density

15. Standards of low-frequency magnetic field - Magnetic flux density

16. Standards of low-frequency electromagnetic field intensity and static electric field

17. Standards of intensity of electromagnetic field from 30kHz - 300GHz

18. Ultraviolet radiation – Acceptable limits

19. Standards of radioactivity

20. X-ray radiation – Acceptable limit

21. Chemicals – Acceptable limits in the working air.

Part 2:  Five (05) principles and seven (07) measurements of labor hygiene

1. Principle 1 – Ergonomic design of labor systems

2. Principle 2 – Ergonomic design of labor positions

3. Principle 3 – Ergonomic design of machinery and tools

4. Principle 4 – Work area layout

5. Principle 5 – Work positions with computers

6. Measurement 1 – Work positions with computers

7. Measurement 2 – Height of work surfaces

8. Measurement 3 – Distance from eyes to things

9. Measurement 4 - View angle

10. Measurement 5 – Footrest

11. Measurement 6 – Lifting height

12. Measurement 7 – Physiological measurements of thermal strain - Limit values

Part 1

TWENTY ONE (21) STANDARDS OF LABOR HYGIENE

I. STANDARDS OF HYGIENIC AMENITIES

1. Scope of regulation: Specifying the number of hygienic amenities for workers.

2. Subjects of application: The facilities that employ workers (production facilities, business establishments, offices…)

3. Definition

The term is construed as follows:

- Hygienic amenities mean: The hygiene works and general amenities serving workers at facilities that employ workers.

4. Standards of hygienic amenities

Hygiene facilities

Standard

Scope of application

Latrine pit

By shift:

1- 10 people/pit

11- 20 people /pit

21 - 30 people /pit

Facilities with:

1- 100 people

101 - 500 people

Over 500 people

Urinary pit

By shift:

1- 10 people /pit

11- 20 people /pit

21 - 30 people /pit

Facilities with:

1- 100 people

101 - 500 people

Over 500 people

Bathroom

By shift:

1- 20 people /room

21- 30 people / room

Over 30 people / room

Facilities with:

1- 300 people

301 - 600 people

Over 600 people

Menstrual hygiene room

By shift:

1- 30 females/ room

Over 30 females/ room

Facilities with:

1 - 300 people

Over 300 people

Hand-washing faucet

By shift:

1 - 20 people / faucet

21 - 30 people / faucet

Over 30 people / faucet

Facilities with:

1 - 100 people

101 - 500 people

Over 500 people

Emergency clean water faucet

 

1 - 200 people /faucet

Over 200 people / faucet

Facilities with:

1 - 1,000 people

Over 1,000 people

Clothes storing place

1 person/slot, hook, or small locker.

Facilities employing workers (production facilities, business establishments, offices…)

Potable water

1.5 liter/person/shift

Facilities hiring workers (production facilities, business establishments, offices…)

II.  STANDARDS OF HYGIENIC DISTANCE

1. Scope of regulation: Minimum distance from the production facility to residential areas.

2. Subjects of application: These standards are applicable to facilities separately situated outside processing and exporting zones or industrial zones that emit toxic substances that harm the environment and human health.

3. Definition

The term is construed as follows:

- Standards of hygienic distance: is the minimum distance from the emission sources in the house, the producing facility or the technology line to residential areas.

4. Standards of hygienic distance:

4.1. Fuel

4.1.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

a. Producing gas, lighting gas, vapor with production over 50,000 m3/hour.

b. Producing inflammable gas with production over 5,000 ton/year.

c. Conducting petroleum refinery and petrochemistry with over 0.5% sulphur.

d. Filtering and treating coal

e. Processing fuel slabs.

f. Producing semi-finished products being naphthalene with production over 2,000 ton/year.

g. Producing hydrocarbons by chloridization and hydrochloridization.

4.1.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Producing inflammable gas from fossil coal or peat with production from 5,000 – 50,000 m3/hour.

b. Processing fossil coal powder.

c. Conducting petroleum refinery and petrochemistry with production under 0.5% sulphur.

d. Producing acetylene from natural gas.

e. Producing inflammable gas with production from 1,000 to 5,000 m3/hour.

f. Processing fluoric gas.

g. Producing acetylene from hydrocarbide

4.1.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing inflammable gas from fossil coal or peat with production under 5,000 m3/hour.

b. Producing inflammable gas with production under 1,000 m3/year.

c. Producing matches

d. Producing compressed oxygen and hydrogen

e. Being fuel depots.

g. Selling petrol.

h. Storing inflammable and explosive materials.

4.2. Chemicals, fertilizers and rubber

4.2.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

a. Producing nitrogen and nitrogenous fertilizer.

b. Producing industrial finished products being dye from benzene and ether with production over 1,000 ton/year.

c. Producing NaOH by electrolysis

d. Producing oil (benzol, toluene, xylol naphthol, phenol cresol, anthracene, phenantrol, acridine, carbazole)

e. Producing chloride rubber “nairit” in facilities that produce chlorine.

f. Producing synthetic ethyl ether.

g. Producing methyl ether and ethyl solution.

h. Producing synthetic chemicals.

i. Producing organic and inorganic acid

- Sulfuric acid.

- Hydrochloric acid

- Nitric acid

- Picric acid.

- Flavic, criolit and fluoric salt.

- Aminolenan.

- Xinhin.

j. Producing

- Mercury.

- Arsenic and inorganic compounds with arsenic.

- Chorine.

- Phosphorus.

- Corundum.

- Beryllium.

4.2.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Producing ammonia

b. Producing

- Niobium.

- Tantalum.

- Rare metal using chloridization.

- Baryum chloride using hydrosulphur.

- Industrial grease (hydrogenated by non-electrolyzing methods).

c. Producing products from asbestos.

d. Producing industrial semi-finished products being aniline paint from benzene and ether with production over 1,000 ton/year.

e. Producing polyethylene and polypropylene from petroleum gas.

f. Producing synthetic fatty acid.

g. Producing synthetic rubber.

h. Recycling rubber.

i. Producing rubber, ebonite and rubber paper.

j. Vulcanizing rubber using hydrosulfur.

k. Producing nicotine.

l. Producing phenol formaldehyde and other artificial powder with production over 300 ton/year.

m. Producing artificial mineral paint.

n. Vulcanizing rubber using hydrosulfur.

o. Recycling rubber.

p. Producing spray paint.

q. Producing, processing, packing, preserving plant protection chemicals.

r. Producing phosphate and superphosphate.

s. Producing soap with production over 2,000 ton/year.

4.2.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing glycerine.

b. Producing natural rubber.

c. Producing shoe rubber without using dusty soluble organic substances.

d. Producing plastic being polyvinyl chloride, vinyl, polyurethane foam, spongy plastic, plastic glass, spyropo.

e. Producing perfume.

f. Vulcanizing rubber without using sulfurcarbon.

g. Producing artificial gems.

h. Producing plastic products or processed from semi-finished plastic materials.

i. Producing soap with production under 2,000 ton/year.

j. Producing products from synthetic powder, polymer and plastic using various methods.

4.3. Ferrous metallurgy

4.3.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

a. Producing magnesium (Chloridizing method).

b. Refining cast iron that the total capacity of the blast furnaces is over 1,500 m3.

c. Producing aluminum by electrolysis

d. Refining steel using open-hearth furnace method and transitional furnace with production over 1,000,000 ton/year.

e. Producing ferrous alloy.

4.3.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Producing magnesium (by non-chloridizing method).

b. Refining cast iron that the total capacity of the blast furnaces from 500 to 1,500 m3.

b. Producing cast iron pipe with production over 10,000 ton/year.

d. Refining steel using open-hearth furnace method, electric furnace and transitional furnace with production under 1,000,000 ton/year.

e. Producing lead-sheathed cable insulated rubber-sheathed cable

4.3.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing bare cable.

b. Processing cast iron, steel with production under 10,000 ton/year.

c. Producing metal electrodes.

4.4. Non-ferrous metallurgy

4.4.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

b. Re-processing non-ferrous metal with production over 3,000 ton/year.

b. Refining non-ferrous metal directly from ore and refined ore.

c. Burning non-ferrous metal ore and burned piryte.

4.4.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Producing non-ferrous metal with production over 2,000 ton/year.

b. Re-processing non-ferrous metal with production from 1,000 to 3,000 ton/year.

c. Producing zinc, copper, nickel, cobalt by electrolyzing solvent with water.

4.4.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing antimony by electrolysis.

b. Plating with zinc, chrome, nickel

4.5. Building material

4.5.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

a. Producing porland cement, porland slag cements, puzolan cement with production over 150,000 ton/year.

b. Producing magnesite lime, dolomitic lime and samot lime using spinning furnace or other kinds of furnaces except for manual furnace.

4.5.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Producing porland cement, porland slag cements, puzolan cement with production under 150,000 ton/year.

b. Producing plaster.

c. Producing building materials (stones, sand, gravel).

d. Producing local cement with production under 5,000 ton/year.

e. Producing magnesite lime, dolomitic lime using manual furnaces.

f. Producing concrete, asphalt.

g. Producing glass wool and slag wool.

h. Producing asphalt paper.

4.5.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing fibro-cement and flagstones

b. Producing artificial stones and products from concrete.

c. Casting stones.

d. Producing products from ceramics and fireproof products.

e. Producing glass.

f. Producing building materials using scrap from thermo-electric power plants.

g. Producing products from porcelain.

h. Producing plaster products.

i. Producing products from clay.

j. Producing stones using non-explosive methods and processing natural stones.

4.6. Treating timber and forest products

4.6.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

- a. Producing charcoal not using the pyrolytic method.

4.6.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Seasoning timber.

a. Producing charcoal by pyrolysis.

4.6.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing wood fiber.

b. Cutting wood; producing plywood and wooden furniture.

c. Building wooden ships and boats.

d. Producing materials from sedge, grass, straw, laminate.

e. Producing products from wood fiber (shavings laminate, wood fiber laminate, wood fiber cement laminate).

f. Producing sedge cloth.

g. Producing wooden furniture, coffins, floor timber.

h. Building wooden ships and boars.

4.7. Textile and garment

4.7.1. A distance of 500m for facilities:

Producing textile and thread using chemicals to treat, bleach and dye.

4.7.2. A distance of 100m for facilities:

- Producing textile and thread without dyeing, producing garment.

4.8. Cellulose and paper

4.8.1. A distance of 1,000m for facilities:

- Producing cellulose by sulphide acid, bisulphide acid and monosulphid acid methods that burn sulphur.

4.8.2. A distance of 500m for facilities:

- Producing fenylaldehyt cloth, paper coils and laminates with production over 100 ton/year.

4.8.3. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing fenylaldehyt cloth, paper coils and laminates with production under 100 ton/year.

b. Producing various kinds of paper and cardboard, products from wood, bamboo, cellulose without using liquified sulfur gas.

4.9. Tanning leather and products from leather and leatherette

4.9.1. A distance of 500m for facilities:

- Producing leatherette using dusty soluble organic substances.

4.9.2. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing leatherette using polyvinylchloride and other powders without using dusty soluble organic substances.

b. Tanning cattle

4.10. Food

4.10.1. A distance of 500m for facilities:

a. Being cattle farm with over 1,000 head.

b. Being slaughterhouse that process fish (fat, oil, fin).

c. Being facilities taking fat from sea animals.

d. Being facilities boiling and cleaning food.

e. Being station for rinsing and cleaning the carriages after carrying cattle.

f. Being sugar plants.

g. Being fishery facilities.

4.10.2. A distance of 100m for facilities:

a. Producing albumin.

b. Producing wine.

c. Grinding, producing cattle feed.

d. Producing meat and freezing meat.

e. Treating coffee.

f. Producing vegetable oil.

g. Producing vegetable butter.

h. Being fruit factories.

i. Producing dextrin, sugar, honey.

j. Boiling cheese.

k. Canning fish, processing fish with waste-recycling workshops, fish factory-chains.

l. Producing powder, alcohol and seasoning.

m. Producing cigarettes using yeast.

n. Producing acetone butyl.

o. Producing beer (together with malt and yeast).

p. Producing canned food.

q. Being fruit depots.

r. Producing sugar lumps.

s. Producing noodles.

t. Producing smoked fish.

u. Producing milk and butter (from animals).

v. Producing sausage with production over 3 ton/shift.

w. Producing sweet with production of 20,000 ton/year or above.

x. Producing bread.

y. Processing food.

z. Producing vinegar.

aa.  Freezing food with capacity over 600 ton.

bb. Producing fruit wine.

cc. Producing fruit juice.

dd. Producing Cognac.

ee. Rolling cigarettes, hatched and dried tobacco.

4.11. Hygiene technical constructions and public amenities

4.11.1. A distance of 1,000m for:

a. Yards for storing and classifying rubbish (solids and liquids) and scrap.

b. Ash pile that stinks or discomposing waste pile.

4.11.2. A distance of 500m for:

a. Rubbish recycling and burning plants.

b. Hygienic waste burial yards.

c. Rubbish classification yards.

d. Industrial waste burial yards.

e. Parking yard of means of waste transport.

f. Reservoir for sewage from cities and town, sewage treatment zones.

g. Graveyards

h. Depots for recyclable materials.

4.11.3. A distance of 100m for:

- Temporary depots of untreated waste materials.

III. MANUAL LABOR – STANDARDS OF TASK CLASSIFICATION BY ENERGY CONSUMPTION

1. Scope of regulation: These standards are applicable to dynamic labor tasks (that release apparent energy) These standards do not apply to static labor tasks (that does not release apparent energy).

2. Subjects of application The workers at facilities that employ workers.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Energy consumption: is the amount of energy being used during the operation or the idle period. Usually represented in watt (W), kilocalorie per minute or per hour (Kcal/minute or Kcal/hour) or Kcal/kg of body weight/minute, or Kcal/minute/m2 of body area.

- Energy consumption by netto: Is the energy consumption while working or resting excluding fundamental metabolism.

- Energy consumption by brutto: Is the energy consumption while working or resting including fundamental metabolism.

4. Standards of classification

Table 1. Classifying tasks by energy consumption

Class

Brutto energy consumption (Kcal/Kg/minute)

Male

Female

Light

Medium

Heavy

Very heavy

Extremely heavy

Maximum

< 0.062

0.062 – 0.080

0.080 – 0.127

0.127 – 0.160

0.160 – 0.200

> 0.20

< 0.050

0.050 – 0.065

0.065 – 0.095

0.095 – 0.125

0.125 – 0.155

> 0.155

IV. MANUAL LABOR – STANDARDS OF TASK CLASSIFICATION BY HEART RATE

1. Scope of regulation: These standards are applicable to the labor tasks (that release apparent energy) in environments of which the temperature does not exceed 320C. These standards do not apply to static labor tasks (that does not release apparent energy).

2. Subjects of application The workers at facilities that employ workers.

3. Definition

The term in these standards is construed as follows:

- Labor heart rate is the heart rate being monitored while the subject has been working at least 3 minutes.

4. Standards of classification

Class

Heart rate (beat/minute)

Light

Medium

Heavy

Very heavy

Extremely heavy

Maximum

< 90

90 - 100

100 - 120

120 - 140

140 - 160

>160

Note: The labor heart rate may be extrapolated from the heart rate of the first recovery minute multiplied with 1.14.

V. CARRYING STANDARDS – LIMITED WEIGHT

1. Scope of regulation: These standards specify the maximum carrying weight for each load of a person that have adapted to strenuous manual labor while doing regular or irregular carrying jobs.

2. Subjects of application: the workers at facilities employing workers.

3. Limit values:

Norm

Limit (kg)

Male

Female

Regular carrying jobs

Irregular carrying jobs

40

20

30

15

VI. LIGHTING STANDARDS

1. Scope of regulation: the requirements for lighting hygiene at workplaces in offices and workshops.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers. These standards are not applicable to outdoor workplaces.

3. Cited standards

The values specified in these standards are recommendations in ISO 8995-1998 and equivalent to TCVN 3743 – 83.

4. Acceptable values

The minimum light intensity for the works is prescribed in Table 1. The maximum value must not exceed 5,000 lux for filament bulbs and 10,000 lux for fluorescent lamps.

Table 1: Light intensity

Kind of interior/work

Class of work

Light intensity (lux)

Fluorescent lamp

Incandescent lamps *

 Indoor shared areas

 Ventilation area, corridor

D - E

50

30

Staircase, elevator

C - D

100

50

Locker room, restroom

C - D

100

50

Warehouse

D - E

100

50

Assembly workshops

Manual tasks, heavy-duty machine assembly

C - D

200

100

Medium tasks, car assembly

B - C

300

150

Precision works, electronics assembly

A - B

500

250

Precision works, tool assembly

A - B

1,000

500

Chemicals

Automated processes

D - E

50

30

Uncrowded production area

C - D

100

50

Shared interior

C - D

200

100

Laboratory

C - D

300

200

Medicine preparation

C - D

300

200

OTK

A - B

500

250

Colorimetry

A - B

750

400

Producing rubber pad

A - B

300

150

Garment industry

Sewing

A - B

500

250

OTK

A - B

750

375

Ironing

A - B

300

150

Electricity industry

Cable production

B - C

200

100

Telephone network installation

A - B

300

200

Line installation

A - B

500

250

Radio assembly

A - B

750

400

Extreme precision assembly of electronic components

A - B

1,000

500

Food industry

Shared working area

C - D

200

100

Automated processes

D - E

150

75

Manual processing, OTK

A - B

300

200

Casting industry

Casting workshop

D - E

150

75

Raw casting, core casting

C - D

200

100

Precision casting, core making, OTK

A - B

300

200

Glass and ceramics industry

Furnace workshop

D - E

100

50

Casting, molding, mixing room

C - D

200

100

Finishing, glazing, polishing

B - C

300

150

Coloring, decorating

A - B

500

250

Grinding glass, precision works

A - B

750

400

Iron and steel industry

Production area without manual work

D - E

50

30

Production area with occasional manual work

D - E

100

50

Fixed workplace in the factory

D - E

300

150

Supervision place and OTK

A - B

300

200

Leather industry

Share working area

B - C

200

100

Molding, cutting, sewing, producing shoes

A - B

500

250

Quality testing, classifying, comparing

A - B

750

400

Machine and machine testing

Unfixed works

D - E

150

75

Manual works, non-manual works, welding

C - D

200

100

Non-manual works with automated machines

B - C

300

150

Precision works, working with machines, precise machines, machine testing

A - B

500

250

Extremely precise works, measurement, OTK, complicated details

A - B

1,000

500

Painting and coloring

Immersion painting, spraying raw paint

D - E

200

100

Usual painting, spraying and finishing

A - B

500

250

Correcting and comparing color

A - B

750

400

Paper industry

Producing paper and cardboard

C - D

200

100

Automated production

D - E

150

75

OTK, classification

A - B

300

150

Printing and bookbinding

Printer room

C - D

300

150

Editing and reading room

A - B

500

250

Precise testing, revising, acid carving

A - B

750

375

Color publishing and printing

A - B

1,000

500

Carving steel and copper

A - B

1500

750

Bookbinding

A - B

300

150

Typesetting, embossing

A - B

500

250

Textile industry

Ornamenting

D - E

200

100

Spinning thread, coiling, winding, dyeing

C - D

300

150

Spinning small thread, weaving

A - B

500

250

Sewing, OTK

A - B

750

375

Carpentry workshop

Sawing area

D - E

150

75

Sitting works, assembly

C - D

200

100

Comparing, selecting wood

B - C

300

150

Finishing, OTK

A -B

500

250

Office

Shared rooms

A - B

300

150

Professional planning room

A - B

500

250

Graphic room

A - B

500

250

Conference room

A - B

300

150

Shops

General lighting at shops

 

 

 

Big shopping malls

B - C

500

250

Small shops

B - C

300

150

Supermarket

B - C

500

250

School

General lighting

A - B

300

150

Office

A - B

300

150

Briefing room

A - B

300

150

Display room

A - B

500

250

Laboratory

A - B

300

150

Art display room

A - B

300

150

Hall

C - D

150

75

Hospital

Areas

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

50

30

Diagnosis room

A - B

200

100

Reading room

A - B

150

100

Night shift

A - B

3

 

Diagnosis room:

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

300

150

Localized diagnosis

A - B

750

375

Intensive treatment

 

 

 

Bed-head

A - B

30

20

Observation place

A - B

200

100

Workplaces of nurses

A - B

200

100

Surgery room

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

500

250

Spot lighting

A - B

10,000

5,000

Automated examination room

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

500

250

Spot lighting

A - B

5,000

2.500

Pharmaceutical and test room

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

300

150

Spot lighting

A - B

500

250

Consultancy room

 

 

 

General lighting

A - B

300

150

Spot lighting

A - B

500

250

Notes:

- A: Works that require extreme precision

- B: Works that require high precision

- C: Works that require precision

- D: Works that require mediocre precision

- E: Works that require little precision

* For places that use both fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps, the incandescent lamp intensity shall prevail

VII. MICROCLIMATE STANDARDS

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the temperature, humidity, air speed, heat radiation intensity.

2. Subjects of application: all facilities that employ workers.

3. Cited standards

The value specified in these standards are equivalent to TCVN 5508 - 1991

4. Acceptable values

Table 1: Requirements of temperature, humidity, air speed, heat radiation intensity.

Time (season)

Work

Air temperature(0C)

Air humidity (%)

Air speed (m/s)

Heat radiation intensity (W/m2)

Max

Min

Cold season

Light

Medium

Heavy

 

20

18

16

80 or under

0.2

0.4

0.5

35 when more than 50% of the human body surface is exposed

70 when more than 25% of the human body surface is exposed

Hot season

Light

Medium

Heavy

34

32

30

 

80 or under

1.5

100 when less than 25% of the human body surface is exposed

For each measurement:

The temperature must not exceed 320C. The production area must not be hotter than 370C.

The temperature difference between the production area and outdoors is from 30C to 50C.

The relative humidity: 75 - 85%.

The wind speed must not exceed 2m/s.

The heat radiation intensity: 1 cal/cm2/minute.

Table 2: Acceptable limits by Yaglou thermal index

Kind of work

Light

Medium

Heavy

Continuous work

30.0

26.7

25.0

50% working, 50% at rest

31.4

29.4

27.9

25% working, 75% at rest

33.2

31.4

30.0

VIII. STANDARDS OF SILICON DUST

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the limited concentration of the dust that contains silicon dioxide (SiO2).

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Cited standards

The value specified in these standards are equivalent to TCVN 5509 - 1991

4. Limit values:

4.1. The maximum acceptable concentration of dust by particle

Table 1: The maximum acceptable concentration of dust by particle

Group of dust

Silicon content (%)

Overall dust concentration (particle/cm3)

Respiratory dust concentration

(particle/cm3)

By shift

By time

By shift

By time

1

From over 50 to 100

200

600

100

300

2

From over 20 to 50

500

1,000

250

500

3

From over 5 to 20

1,000

2,000

500

1,000

4

From 5 and fewer

1,500

3,000

800

1,500

4.2. The maximum acceptable concentration of dust by weight

Table 2: The maximum acceptable concentration of dust by weight

Group of dust

Silicon content (%)

Overall dust concentration (mg/m3)

Respiratory dust concentration

 (mg/m3)

By shift

By time

By shift

By time

1

100

0.3

0.5

0.1

0.3

2

From over 50 to under 100

1,0

2.0

0.5

1.0

3

From over 20 to 50

2.0

4.0

1.0

2.0

4

From 20 and fewer

3.0

6.0

2.0

4.0

IX. STANDARDS OF NON-SILICON DUST

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the limited concentration of the dust without silicon dioxide (SiO2).

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Limit values:

Table 1: The maximum acceptable concentration of non-silicon dust

Kind

Substance

Overall dust concentration (mg/m3)

Overall dust concentration
(mg/m3)

1

Activated carbon, aluminum, bentonite, diatomite, graphite, kaolin, pyrite, talcum powder

2

1

2

Bakelite, coal, ferric oxide, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, silicate, apatite, beryl, phosphatide, limestone, pearlite, marble, portland cement

4

2

3

Dust of herb, animal: tea, tobacco, wood dust, cereal dust

6

3

4

Organic and inorganic dust not belonging to kind 1, 2, 3

8

4

X. STANDARDS OF COTTON DUST

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the limited concentration of dust of cotton and artificial cotton.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Limit values:

The maximum acceptable concentration of cotton dust (sampling for 8 hours): 1 mg/m3

XI. STANDARDS OF ASBESTOS DUST

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable values of vocational exposures to every kind of asbestos dust belonging to the Serpentine (Chrysotile) group in the air of the production area.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that workers.

3. Limit values:

Table 1: The acceptable values of vocational exposures to asbestos dust

No.

Substance

In 8 hours (fiber/ml)

In 1 hour (fiber/ml)

1

Serpentine (Chrysotile)

0.1

0.5

2

Amphibole

0

0

XII. STANDARDS OF NOISE

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable noise levels at workplaces in workshops, factories and agencies affected by the noise.

2. Subjects of application: Every facility that employs workers.

3. Cited standards

The acceptable values specified in these standards are equivalent to TCVN 3985 - 1999

4. Acceptable levels

4.1. The continuous noise level equivalent to Leq dBA at workplaces must not exceed 85 dBA in 8 hours.

4.2. If the time of exposure to the noise reduces by 50%, the acceptable noise level may increases 5 more dB.

For 4 hours of exposure, 5 dB increased, the acceptable level is 90 dBA

2 hours                                                    95 dBA

1 hour                                                    100 dBA

30 minutes                                              105 dBA

15 minutes                                              110 dBA

< 15 minutes                                            115 dBA

The maximum loudness is 115 dBA.

Only exposure to noise under 80 dBA is acceptable for the remaining time of the working day .

4.3. The acceptable noise pressure level for noise under 5 dB compared to the values specified in section 4.1, 4.2.

4.4. In order to achieve the productivity at various working positions, the noise pressure level at such places must not exceed the values in the below table.

Table 1: The noise pressure level at working positions

Work positions

Limit of noise level or the equivalent (dBA)

Limit of noise level (dB) of the corresponding octave (Hz)

63

125

250

500

1,000

2,000

4,000

8,000

1. Working areas of workers, places with workers in workshops and factories

85

99

92

86

83

80

78

76

74

2. Monitoring and remote control rooms without telephone, laboratories, computer rooms with noisy equipment.

80

94

87

82

78

75

73

71

70

3. Monitoring and remote control rooms with telephone, coordination room, precision assembly room, typing room..

70

87

79

72

68

65

63

61

59

4. Functional, administrative, accounting, planning, statistics rooms.

65

83

74

68

63

60

57

55

54

5. Mental working, designing, researching, statistics, programming, figure processing rooms and theoretic laboratory

55

75

66

59

54

50

47

45

43

XIII. STANDARDS OF VIBRATION

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable vibration levels of chairs, working floors, control devices and tool handles that produces vibration affecting the workers during the production.

2. Subjects of application: Every facility that employ workers.

3. Cited standards

These standards are equivalent to TCVN 5127 - 90

4. Acceptable rate

The vibration levels at the working places must not exceed the values specified in Table 1, 2, 3.

Table 1: Vibration of working floors and chairs

Frequency band (Hz)

Acceptable vibration velocity (cm/s)

Vertical vibration

Horizontal vibration

1 (0.88 – 1.4)

12.6

5.0

2 (1.4 – 2.8)

7.1

3.5

4 (2.8 – 5.6)

2.5

3.2

8 (5.6 – 11.2)

1.3

3.2

16 (11.2 – 22.4)

1.1

3.2

31.5 (22.4 - 45)

1.1

3.2

63 (45 - 90)

1.1

3.2

125 (90 - 180)

1.1

3.2

250 (180 - 355)

1.1

3.2

Table 2: Vibration of control devices

Frequency band (Hz)

Acceptable vibration velocity (cm/s)

Vertical vibration

Horizontal vibration

16 (11.2 – 22.4)

4.0

4.0

31.5 (22.4 - 45)

2.8

2.8

63 (45 - 90)

2.0

2.0

125 (90 - 180)

1.4

1.4

250 (180 - 355)

1.0

1.0

Table 3: Vibration of the tool handles

Frequency band (Hz)

Acceptable vibration velocity (cm/s)

Correction coefficient k0*

8 (5.6 – 11.2)

2.8

0.5

16 (11.2 – 22.4)

1.4

1

31.5 (22.4 - 45)

1.4

1

63 (45 - 90)

1.4

1

125 (90 - 180)

1.4

1

250 (180 - 355)

1.4

1

500 (355 - 700)

1.4

1

1,000 (700 - 1400)

1.4

1

* The correction coefficient k0  is used for calculating the corrective vibration velocity VhD (or total vibration velocity)

The acceptable corrective vibration velocity must not exceed 4 cm/s in 8 hours

The acceptable VhD by time:

8 hours – 4.0 cm/s               4 hours – 5.6 cm/s

7 hours – 4.2 cm/s               3 hours – 6.5 cm/s

6 hours – 4.6 cm/s               2 hours – 8.0 cm/s

5 hours – 5.0 cm/s               1 hours – 11.3 cm/s

< 0.5 hours under 16 cm/s

XIV. STANDARDS OF STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD - MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable levels of magnetic flux density of static magnetic field in working environments affected by the static magnetic field.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Medical equipment: is the medical equipment aiding the physiological functions such as pacing systems.

4. Acceptable levels

Table 1: Acceptable levels of magnetic flux density of static magnetic field.

Subjects of application

8 hours of exposure

Maximum limit

Entire body

60 mT (600G)

2 T (2.104G)

Limbs

600 mT (6000G)

5 T (5.104G)

Attached medical equipment

-

0.5 mT (5G)

XV. STANDARDS OF LOW-FREQUENCY MAGNETIC FIELD - MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable levels of magnetic flux density of low-frequency magnetic field at work areas.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Low frequency: are frequencies from 30 KHz and lower.

4. Acceptable levels

Table 1: The acceptable levels of vocational exposures to low-frequency magnetic field

 

Frequency band

Acceptable level

Acceptable value  60/f

Maximum level

0.2 mT (2 G)

- f: the frequency of electric current (in Hz)

XVI. STANDARDS OF INTENSITY OF LOW-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELD AND STATIC ELECTRIC FIELD

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable levels of magnetic flux density of low frequency magnetic field at working areas.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Acceptable levels

Table 1: Acceptable levels of intensity of electric field below 30 KHz.

 

Frequency band

0 Hz - 100Hz

100Hz - 4kHz

4kHz - 30kHz

Maximum value

25kV/m

(2,5 x 106)/f

625V/m

- f: the frequency of electric current (in Hz)

XVII. STANDARDS OF INTENSITY OF ELECTRIC FIELD FROM 30KHz - 300GHz

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable levels electromagnetic field intensity and the energy density of electromagnetic waves 30kHz-300GHz at working areas.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Acceptable levels

Table 1a: Acceptable levels of intensity of electromagnetic field from 30KHz-300MHz.

Frequency

Electromagnetic field intensity (E)

(V/m)

Magnetic field intensity (H)

(A/m)

Average value of E, H over a period (second)

30kHz – 1.5MHz

50

5

30

1.5MHz - 3MHz

50

5

30

3MHz - 30MHz

20

0.5

30

30MHz - 50MHz

10

0.3

30

50MHz - 300MHz

5

0.163

30

Table 1: Acceptable values of energy density of radiation from 300MHz - 300GHz.

Frequency

Energy density (W/cm2)

Acceptable exposure duration in 1 day

Notes

300MHz - 300GHz

< 10

1 day

 

10 - 100

< 2 hours

The energy density must not exceed 10 W/cm2 for the rest.

100 - 1,000

< 20 minutes

Table 2: Acceptable values of contacting current and inductive current.

Maximum current (mA)

Frequency

Through 2 feet

Through each foot

Contact

30kHz - 100kHz

2000f

1,000f

1,000f

100kHz - 100MHz

200

100

100

- f: the frequency of high-frequency electric current (in Hz)

XVIII. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION – ACCEPTABLE LEVELS

1. Scope of regulation: These standards specify the acceptable values of ultraviolet radiation within the spectrum from 180nm - 400nm (from arc, electric vapor discharge, fluorescence and intensive light sources, solar radiation). Ultraviolet laser is not regulated.

2. Subjects of application: the facilities that employ workers.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Near-ultraviolet spectrum: are light waves of which the wavelengths range from 315nm - 400nm.

4. Acceptable levels

- The acceptable values of exposure to ultraviolet radiation that damage skin or eyes where the radiation values are known and the exposure durations are controlled:

4.1. Unprotected bare eye exposures to near-ultraviolet spectrum:

a. For duration < 103 seconds, the radiation exposure must not exceed 1,0 J/cm2.

b. For duration ≥103 seconds, the total radiation energy must not exceed 1.0 mW/cm2.

4.2. The exposure of unprotected skin or eyes to ultraviolet radiation must not exceed the values specified in Table 1 in 8 hours

Table 1: Acceptable levels of ultraviolet radiation and spectral weighting function in 8 hours.

Wavelength (nm)

Acceptable levels (mJ/cm2)

 Spectrum intensity coefficient (S)

180

250

0.012

190

160

0.019

200

100

0.030

205

59

0.051

210

40

0.075

215

32

0.095

220

25

0.120

225

20

0.150

230

16

0.190

235

13

0.240

240

10

0.300

245

8.3

0.360

250

7.0

0.430

254

6.0

0.500

255

5.8

0.520

260

4.6

0.650

265

3.7

0.810

270

3.0

0.1

275

3.1

0.960

280

3.4

0.880

285

3.9

0.770

290

4.7

0.640

295

5.6

0.540

297

6.5

0.460

300

10

0.300

303

25

0.120

305

50

0.060

308

120

0.026

310

200

0.015

313

500

0.006

315

1.0 x 103

0.003

316

1.3 x 103

0.0024

317

1.5 x 103

0.0020

318

1.9 x 103

0.0016

319

2.5 x 103

0.0012

320

2.9 x 103

0.0010

322

4.5 x 103

0.00067

323

5.6 x 103

0.00054

325

6.0 x 103

0.00050

328

6.8 x 103

0.00044

330

7.3 x 103

0.00041

333

8.1 x 103

0.00037

335

8.8 x 103

0.00034

340

1.1 x 104

0.00028

345

1.3 x 104

0.00024

350

1.5 x 104

0.00020

355

1.9 x 104

0.00016

360

2.3 x 104

0.00013

365

2.7 x 104

0.00011

370

3.2 x 104

0.000093

375

3.9 x 104

0.000077

380

4.7 x 104

0.000064

385

5.7 x 104

0.000053

390

6.8 x 104

0.000044

395

8.3 x 104

0.000036

400

1.0 x 105

0.000030

Table 2: Acceptable levels of ultraviolet radiation.

Exposure duration/day

Effective radiation

Eeff (W/cm2)

8 hours

0.1

4 hours

0.2

2 hours

0.4

1 hour

0.8

30 minutes

1.7

15 minutes

3.3

10 minutes

3.3

5 minutes

10

1 minute

50

30 seconds

100

10 seconds

300

1 second

3,000

0.5 second

6,000

0.1 second

30,000

XIX. STANDARDS OF RADIOACTIVITY

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the acceptable values of doses and levels of radioactive substances and radioactive rays at workplaces.

2. Subjects of application: These standards are applicable to people that directly or indirectly work with ionizing radiation. The general residents are not regulated.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Ionizing radiation, as known as radioactivity, are all kinds of radiations (electromagnetic and particle radiation) that creates ions when interacting with the environment.

- Radiation bases: are places that use radiation sources such as:

+ X-ray devices, -ray emitters

+ Sources of closed radiation such as: Radium 226, cobalt, Strontium 90.

+ Sources of open radiation such as: I-131, P-32, U-238, Th-232.

- External radiation: radiation from a source outside the body.

- Internal radiation: radiation from a source inside the body.

- Equivalent dose: is the equivalent dose for a period of time (Rem/hour). Rem: Roentgent equivalent in man.

- Control zone: is the contiguous zones around the radiation bases or the radioactive gas discharge pipe

- Supervision zone: is the area outside the control zone that might be affected by the gaseous, liquid or solid radioactive substances.

4. Cited standards

- These standards are equivalent to TCVN 4397 - 87

5. Acceptable doses

The equivalent dose at working positions of the radiation bases must not exceed the values specified in Table 1.

Table 1: Acceptable equivalent dose

Radiated subjects

Workplace

P (mrem/h) with t  40h/week

Subject A

- Regular workplaces

- Workplaces under 20h/week

1.2

2.4

Subject B

- In other working rooms within the control zone

- In supervision zones

0.12

0.03

Notes: Subject A: Radiation worker

Subject B: Adjacent people

5.2. The limited doses in a year (for both internal and external radiation) of the radiated subjects and the vital organs are specified in Table 2:

Table 2: Limited dose in a year

Human subject

Limited dose for vital organs (rem/year)

Group I

Group II

Group III

A

5

15

30

B

0.5

1.5

3

Notes:

- Group I: whole-body, gonads, bone marrow.

- Group II: Organs outside Group I and III

- Group III: Skin, tissue, bones, hands, legs, feet, ankles

5.3. The limited density of radioactive substances in the air or workplaces are specified in Table 3. That of the radioactive compounds with unknown compositions are specified in Table 4.

5.4. The radioactive contamination levels of surfaces at workplaces and protective instruments are specified in Table 5.

5.5. The total accumulative doses of Subject A at any age over 18 are calculated by the formula:

D  5 (N - 18)

- D: Dose (in Rem).

- N: Age (in year).

If necessary, the accumulative dose may reach 12 rem/year, but then must be offset in 5 years so that the total dose would not exceed D.

Table 3: The limited air density of nuclides of which the compositions are totally or partly unknown (Ci/l)

The composition of radioactive nuclide mixtures that contaminate through the respiratory tract

Subject A

Subject B

Unknown composition

4 x 10-16

1 x 10-17

The composition does not contain Cm-248

8 x 10-16

3 x 10-17

The composition does not contain: PA-231, Pu 239, Pu-240. Pu 242, Cm-248, Cf-249, Cf-251

2 x 10-15

5 x 10-17

The composition does not contain: Ac-227, Th-230. Pa-231, Pu238, Pu-239, Pu-240. Pu-242, Pu-244, Cm-248, Cf-249, Cf-251

4 x 10-15

1 x 10-16

The composition does not contain any alpha radiation and Ac-227

2 x 10-14

8 x 10-16

The composition does not contain any alpha radiation and Pb-210. Ac-227, Ra-228, Pu-241

2 x 10-13

8 x 10-15

The composition does not contain any alpha radiation and Sr-90. I-192, Pb-210. Ac-227, Ra-228, Pa-230. Pu-241, Bk-249

2 x 10-16`

8 x 10-13

Table 4: The limited density of radioactive substances in the working air

No.

Radioactive nuclide

Form in compounds

Limited density in the working air Ci/l

No.

Radioactive nuclide

Form in compounds

Limited density in the working air Ci/l

Subject A

Subject B

Subject A

Subject B

1

H-3(T)

Insoluble Soluble

2.0x10-6

4.8x10-9

6.6x10-8

1.6x10-10

31

Co-57

Soluble

Insoluble

1.6x10-11

5.5x10-12

2

C-14

Soluble

3.5x10-9

1.2x10-10

32

Co-58

Soluble

Insoluble

5.6x10-11

1.9x10-12

3

F-18

Soluble

Insoluble

2.6x10-9

8.7x10-11

33

Co-60

Soluble

Insoluble

8.8x10-12

3.0x10-13

4

Na-22

Soluble

Insoluble

8.4 x10-12

2.9x10-13

34

Ni-63

Soluble

Insoluble

6.4x10-11

2.2x10-12

5

Na-24

Soluble

Insoluble

1.4x10-10

4.9x10-12

35

Cu-64

Soluble

Insoluble

1.0x10-9

3.6x10-11

6

P-32

Soluble

Insoluble

7.2x10-11

2.4x10-12

36

Zn-65

Soluble

Insoluble

6.0x10-11

2.6x10-12

7

S-35

Soluble

Insoluble

3.6x10-11

1.2x10-12

37

As-74

Soluble

Insoluble

1.2x10-10

4.2x10-12

8

Cl-36

Soluble

Insoluble

2.3x10-11

7.8x10-13

38

Se-75

Soluble

Insoluble

1.2x10-10

4.2x10-12

9

K-42

Soluble

Insoluble

1.1x10-10

3.7x10-12

39

Br-82

Soluble

Insoluble

1.9x10-10

6.4x10-12

10

Ca-43

Soluble

 

3.2x10-11

1.1x10-12

40

Rb-86

Soluble

Insoluble

6.8x10-11

2.3x10-12

11

Ca-47

Insoluble

1.7x10-10

5.8x10-12

41

Sr-89

Soluble

 

2.8x10-11

9.4x10-13

12

Cr-51

Soluble

Insoluble

2.2x10-9

7.7x10-11

42

Sr-90

Soluble

 

1.2x10-12

4.0x10-14

13

Mn-52

Soluble

Insoluble

1.4x10-10

4.8x10-12

43

Y-90

Soluble

Insoluble

1.0x10-10

3.5x10-12

14

Mn-54

Soluble

Insoluble

3.6x10-11

1.2x10-12

44

Zr-93

Soluble

Insoluble

1.3x10-10

4.4x10-12

15

Fe-55

Soluble

Insoluble

8.4x10-10

2.9x10-11

45

Tc-99m

Soluble

Insoluble

1.4x10­-9

4.8x10-10

16

Fe-59

Soluble

Insoluble

5.2x10-11

1.8x10-12

46

Tc-99

Soluble

Insoluble

6.0x10-11

2.1x10-12

17

Mo-99

Soluble

Insoluble

2.0x10-10

6.9x10-12

47

Au-198

Soluble

Insoluble

2.4x10-10

8.0x10-12

18

In-113m

Soluble

Insoluble

6.8x10-9

2.3x10-10

48

Hg-197

Soluble

Insoluble

1.2x10-9

4.0x10-11

19

Sb-124

Soluble

Insoluble

1.9x10-11

6.6x10-13

49

Hg-203

Soluble

Insoluble

7.2x10-11

2.5x10-12

20

I-125

Soluble

 

4.8x10-12

1.6x10-13

50

TI-201

Soluble

Insoluble

8.8x10-10

3.0x10-11

21

I-126

Soluble

 

3.6x10-12

1.2x10-13

51

Pb-210

Soluble

Insoluble

6.0x10-14

2.0x10-13

22

I-129

Soluble

 

8.0x10-13

2.7x10-14

52

Po-21

Soluble

Insoluble

9.3x10-14

3.1x10-15

23

I-131

Soluble

 

4.2x10-12

1.5x10-13

53

Ra-226

Soluble

Insoluble

2.5x10-14

8.5x10-18

24

Cs-131

Soluble

Insoluble

1.0x10-8

3.6x10-10

54

Th-232

Soluble

Insoluble

1.0x10-15

2.5x10-14

25

Cs-134m

Soluble

Insoluble

6.0x10-9

2.0x10-10

55

U-235

7.1x 10-8năm

Soluble

Insoluble

6.0x10-14

 

26

Cs-134

Soluble

Insoluble

1.3x10-11

4.4x10-14

56

U-238

Soluble

Insoluble

6.3x10-14

2.2x10-15

27

Cs-137

Soluble

Insoluble

1.4x10-14

4.9x10-13

57

Am-241

Soluble

Insoluble

3.0x10-15

1.0x10-16

28

Ba-131

Soluble

Insoluble

3.5x10-10

1.2x10-11

58

Cm-244

Soluble

Insoluble

46x10-15

1.5x10-16

29

La-140

Soluble

Insoluble

1.2x10-10

4x10-12

59

Cf-252

Soluble

Insoluble

3.2x10-15

1.1x10-16

30

Ir-192

Soluble

Insoluble

2.6x10-11

8.7x10-13

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:  Other specifications of the radioactive nuclides in this Table can be found in "Safety Norm of ionizing radiation” TCVN 4397-87

Table 5: Contamination levels of surfaces (particle/cm2/minute)(1)

Contaminated subject

Nuclide emitting alpha particle

Nuclide emitting beta particle (4)

Special nucleus(2)

Other nuclei

Skin, towel, internal clothes, inner side of the front side of personal safety instruments.

1

1

100

Primary safety outfit, inner side of additional safety instruments

5

20

800

Surface of rooms with regular workers, outer side of additional safety instrument in these rooms.

5

20

2,000

Surface of machinery rooms without regular workers, outer side of additional safety instrument in these rooms.

50

200

8,000

Means of transport, outer side of containers and wrap of radioactive substances in the control zones(3).

10

10

100

Notes:

(1) For surfaces of working rooms, equipment, means of transport, containers, wrap, the contamination level is determined using dry cleaning method according to the non-sticky contamination amount (cleanable). For other cases, the contamination levels are determined by the total contamination level (non-sticky and sticky)

(2) Special nuclides are nuclides that emit alpha particles with acceptable density in the working air being 1.10-14 Curi/liter.

(3) The radioactive contamination on the outer side of the radioactive substance container and means of transport are not allowed outside the control zone.

(4) For Sr-90. Sr-90 + Y-90, the acceptable contamination level is 5 times lower. The tritium contamination is not regulated because it is controlled by the content in the air and in the body.

XX. X-RAY RADIATION – ACCEPTABLE LEVELS

1. Scope of regulation:

These standards specify the requirements for radiation safety of medical X-ray facilities.

2. Subjects of application: medical X-ray facilities.

3. Definition

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Medical X-ray facilities are medical facilities using X-ray devices for medical examination and treatment.

4. Cited standards

These standards are equivalent to TCVN 6561-1999

5. Acceptable levels

5.1. Limited doses

Table 1: Acceptable doses in a year

Kind of dose and subjects of application

Radiation worker

Apprentice from 16-18 years old

Other people

Systemic effective dose

20mSv

6mSv

1mSv

Equivalent dose for crystalline lens

150mSv

50mSv

15mSv

Equivalent dose for limbs or skin

500mSv

150mSv

50mSv

Lounge and waiting room

 

 

1mSv

Notes: - The doses when working with X-ray do not include natural background radiation.

- Doses for special cases are specified in the Annex

Table 2: Acceptable instantaneous doses in X-ray rooms

Location

Dose (Sv/h)

- Directly radiated workers

10.0

- Film development room

0.50

- Patient waiting room or lounge

0.50

- Working rooms and workplaces of employees

0.50

- The outer side X-ray machine

0.50

5.2.  Limited doses in special cases

5.2.1. Effective doses for radiation worker: 20mSv, averagely sampled in 5 consecutive working years. The dose may reach 50mSv in a single year but the average dose in 5 years must not exceed 20mSv/year.

The effective dose for radiation workers is 20mSv/year being averagely sampled in 10 consecutive working years and the dose in any single year does not exceed 50mSv.

When the accumulative effective dose of a radiation worker reaches 100mSv, it must be reconsidered.  If his/her health is still normal without manifestation of radioactive impacts, the blood formula is still unchanged etc., the work may continue.

5.2.2. Effective doses for other people: The dose may reach 5 mSv in a single year but the average dose in 5 consecutive years must not exceed 1 mSv/year The layout, sizes and radiation protection methods are specified in the Annex.

5.3. Location of a X-ray facility

The X-ray facility must be isolated from paediatrics, obstetrics, crowded areas etc,  especially the tenements.

5.4. Layout  of a X-ray facility

Each X-ray facility must contain at least the following rooms:

- The patient waiting room or lounge,

- The X-ray machine room,

- The film development room,

- The working room or place of radiation workers.

5.4.1. The Patient waiting room or lounge:

- The patient waiting room (or lounge) must be separated from the X-ray room. The limited dose in this room must not exceed 1mSv/year.

5.4.2. The X-ray machine room must satisfy the following requirements:

- Convinient for the installation and operation, safe for the patients to moves. The minimum area is 25 m2, the minimum width is 4.5 m, the minimum height is 3m for an ordinary X-ray machine.

- The breast, teeth X-ray machines and CT scanners must comply with the standardized size in Table 3.

Table 3: The minimum size of working rooms for medical X-ray machines

Work

Room area

Minimum side length

- (CT scanner room)

+ 2-dimension

+ 3-dimension

 

28 m2

40 m2

 

4 m

4 m

- X-ray room for teeth

12 m2

3 m

- X-ray room for breast

18 m2

4 m

- X-ray machine with contrast medium

30 m2

4.5 m

- X-ray machine with signal contrast medium

36 m2

5.5 m

- Automated dark room

7 m2

2.5 m

- Non-automated dark room

8 m2

2.5 m

- If the room design for new machines recommended by the producer is smaller than the above measurements, the consent of competent State agencies is compulsory.

- The thickness of the walls, the ceiling, the floor and the doors of the X-ray machine room must be calculated and designed in accordance with specifications of the equipment (voltage, current intensity), operation duration and the outer occupation coefficient of the X-ray room.

- The minimum height of the vents and windows of the X-ray room where people pass by is 2 m from the floor outside the X-ray room.

- The radiation signal light must be put at the eye level outside the door of the X-ray room. The signal light must glow throughout the radiation emission of the machine.

- The X-ray machine installation must ensure that the X-ray beam is not emitted toward the door or places with many people, and the eyes must be protected from the radiation sources. The shield height must be over 2m from the floor, the minimum width is 90cm and the corresponding thickness is 1.5mm of lead.

- For rooms with 2 X-ray machines, only 1 is allowed to operate at a time.

- The control panel is put inside or outside the X-ray room depending on the machine itself. There must be lead glass for observing the patient. The limited dose at the control panel must not exceed 20 mSv/year (excluding natural background radiation).

5.4.3. The film development room (the dark room):

- The dark room must be separated from the X-ray room.

- The dose in the dark room must not affect the film development. The undeveloped film must not be radiated over 1 mSv/year, excluding natural background radiation.

- The dark room door must not be directly radiated.

- The cassette pass box in the X-ray room must be covered with 2 mm lead.

5.4.4. The working room (or place) of radiation workers:

- The working room (or place) of radiation workers must be separated from the X-ray room. The doses in the room must not exceed 1 mSv/year, excluding natural background radiation.

XXI. CHEMICALS – ACCEPTABLE LIMITS IN THE WORKING AIR

1. Scope of regulation

These standards specify the maximum acceptable density of a number of chemicals in the working air.

2. Subjects of application

These standards are applicable to facilities that employ workers (production facilities, trading and service establishments…)

These standards are not applicable to the air in residential areas.

3. Limit values

Table 1: Limit values of chemicals in the air at working areas

No.

Chemical name

Chemical formula

Average value in 8 hours (mg/m3)

(TWA)

Maximum value at a time (mg/m3)

(STEL)

1

Acrolein

CH2CHCHO

0.25

0.50

2

Acrylic amide

CH2CHCONH2

0.03

0.2

3

Acrylonitrile

CH2CHCN

0.5

2,5

4

Allyl acetate

C5H8O3

-

2

5

Ammonia

NH3

17

25

6

Amyl acetate

CH3COOC5H11

200

500

7

Phthalic anhydride

C8H4O3

2

3

8

Aniline

C6H5NH2

4

8

9

Antimony

Sb

0.2

0.5

10

ANTU

C10H7NHC(NH2)S

0.3

1.5

11

Arsenic and compounds

As

0.03

-

12

Arsine              

AsH3

0.05

0.1

13

Asphalt         

            

5

10

14

Acetone

(CH3)2CO

200

1,000

15

Acetone cyanohydrin

CH3C(OH)CNCH3

-

0.9

16

Acetonitrile

CH3CN

50

100

17

Acetylene

C2H2

-

1,000

18

2, 4 - D (Dichloro - phenoxyacetic acid)

Cl2C6H3OCH2COOH

5

10

19

2, 4, 5 - T (Trichloro - phenoxyacetic acid)

C6 H2Cl3OCH2COOH

5

10

20

Acetic acid

CH3COOH

25

35

21

Boric acid and compounds

H2BO3

0.5

1

22

Hydrochloric acid

HCl

5

7,5

23

Formic acid

HCOOH

9

18

24

Methacrylic acid

C4H6O2

50

80

25

Nitrous acid

HNO2

45

90

26

Nitric acid

HNO3

5

10

27

Oxalic acid

(COOH)2.2H2O

1

2

28

Phosphoric acid

H3PO4

1

3

29

Picric acid

HOC6H2(NO2)3

0.1

0.2

30

Sulfuric acid

H2SO4

1

2

31

Thioglycolic acid

C2H4O2S

2

5

32

Trichloroacetic acid

C2HCl3O2

2

5

33

Azinphos methyl

C10H12O3 PS2N3

0.02

0.06

34

Aziridine

H2CNHCH2

0.02

-

35

Silver

Ag

0.01

0.1

36

Silver compounds

như Ag

0.01

0.03

37

Barium oxide

BaO2

0.6

6

38

Benomyl

C14H18N4O3

5

10

39

Benzene

C6H6

5

15

40

Benzidine

NH2C6H4C6H4NH2

0.008

-

41

Benzonitrile

C7H5N

-

1

42

Benzopyrene

C20H12

0,0001

0,0003

43

(o, p) Benzoquinone

C6 H4O2

0.4

1,0

44

Benzotrichloride

C7H5 Cl3

-

0.2

45

Benzoyl peroxide

C14H10O4

-

5

46

Benzylchloride

C6H5CH2 Cl

-

0.5

47

Beryllium and compounds

Be

-

0.001

48

Polychlorinated biphenyls

C12H10-xCx

0.01

0.02

49

Boron trifluoride

BF3

0.8

1

50

Bromine

Br2

0.5

1

51

Bromoethane

C2H5Br

500

800

52

Bromomethane

CH3Br

20

40

53

Bromine pentafluoride

BrF5

0.5

1

54

1,3-Butadiene

CH2CHCHCH2

20

40

55

Butyl acetate

CH3 COO[CH2]3 CH3

500

700

56

Butanols

CH3(CH2)3 OH

150

250

57

Octa decanoic acid, cadmium

C36H72O4Cd

0.04

0.1

58

Cadmium and compounds

Cd

0.01

0.05

59

Carbondioxide

CO2

900

1800

60

Carbon disulfide

CS2

15

25

61

Carbonmonoxide

CO

20

40

62

Carbontetrachlorie

CCl4

10

20

63

Carbofuran

C17H15O3N

0.1

-

64

Carbonyl fluoride

COF2

5

13

65

Calcium carbonate

CaCO3

10

-

66

Calcium chromate

CaCrO4

0.05

-

67

Calcium hydroxyde

Ca(OH)2

5

-

67

Calcium oxide

CaO

2

4

69

Calcium silicate

CaSiO3

10

-

70

Calcium sulfate dihydrate

CaSO4.2H2O

6

-

71

Calcium cyanamide

C2CaN2

0.5

1.0

72

Caprolactam (dust)

C6H11NO

1

3

73

Caprolactam (fume)

C6H11NO

20

-

74

Captan

C9H8 Cl3NO2S

5

-

75

Carbaryl

C10H7O O CNHCH3

1

10

76

Catechol

C15H14O6

20

45

77

Lead tetraethyl

Pb(C2H5)4

0.005

0.01

78

Lead and compounds

Pb

0.05

0.1

79

Chlorine

Cl2

1.5

3

80

Chloroacetaldeh-yde

ClCH2CHO

3

-

81

Chlorine dioxide

ClO2

0.3

0.6

82

Chloroacetophe-none

C6H5COCH2Cl

0.3

-

83

Chlorobenzene

C6H5Cl

100

200

84

1- Chloro - 2,4 -dinitro - benzene

C6H3ClN2O4

0.5

1

85

Chloronitrobenzene

C6H4ClNO2

1

2

86

Chloroprene

CH2CClCHCH2

30

60

87

1- Chloro 2 - propanone

C3H5ClO

-

3

88

Chloroform

CHCl3

10

20

89

Chloropicrin

CCl3NO2

0.7

1.4

90

3-Chloropropene

C2H5Cl

1

2

91

Chlorotrifluoroethy-lene

C2ClF3

-

5

92

Cobalt and compounds

Co

0.05

0.1

93

Cresol

C7H8O

5

10

94

Chromium trioxide

CrO3

0.05

0.1

95

Chromium (III) compounds

Cr+3

0.5

-

96

Chromium (VI) compounds

Cr+4

0.05

-

97

Chrom (VI) compound (water soluble)

Cr+6

0.01

-

98

Crotonaldehyde

CH3CHCHCHO

5

10

99

Cumene

C6H5CH(CCH3)2

80

100

100

Mineral (mist)

 

5

10

101

Petroleum distillates (naphta)

 

1600

-

102

Turpentine

C10H16

300

600

103

Vegetable oil mist

 

10

-

104

Diamino 4, 4’-diphenyl methane

NH2C6H4C6H4NH2

-

0.8

105

Dimethyl - 1, 2 - dibromo - 2,2 - dichlorethyl phosphate (Naled)

(CH3O)2POOCHBrCBrCl2

3

6

106

Rubber solvent

 

1570

-

107

Stoddard solvent (White spirit)

 

525

 

108

Soapston

3MgO.4SiO2.H2O

3

-

109

Soapstone

3MgO.4SiO2.H2O

6

-

110

Decalin

C10H18

100

200

111

Demeton

C8H19O3PS2

0.1

0.3

112

Diazinon

C12H21N2O3PS

0.1

0.2

113

Diborane

B2H6

0.1

0.2

114

1,2 - Dibromo - 3 chloro - propane

C3H5Br2Cl

0.01

-

115

Dibutyl phthalate

C6H4(CO2C4H9)2

2

4

116

Dichloroacetylene

ClCCCl

0.4

1.2

117

Dichlorobenzene

C6H4Cl2

20

50

118

Dichloroethane

CH3CHCl2

4

8

119

1,1- Dichloroethylene

C2H2Cl2

8

16

120

Dichloroethylene (1,2; Cis; Trans)

C2H2Cl2

790

1,000

121

Dichloromethane

CH2Cl2

50

100

122

1,2- Dichloropropan

C3H6Cl2

50

100

123

Dichloropropene

C3H4Cl2

5

-

124

Dichlorostyrene

C8H6Cl2

50

-

125

Dichlorvos

(CH3O)2PO2CHCCl2

1

3

126

Dicrotophos

C8H16NO5P

0.25

-

127

Dimethylamine

C2H7N

1

2

128

Dimethyl formamide

(CH3)2NCHO

10

20

129

1,1 Dimethyl hydrazine

(CH3)2 NNH2

0.2

0.5

130

Dimethyl phenol

C8H10O

-

2

131

Dimethyl sulfate

(CH3)2SO4

0.05

0.1

132

Dimethyl sulfoxide

C2H6OS

20

50

133

Dinitrobenzene

C7H6N2O4

-

1

134

Dinitrotoluene (DNT)

C6 H5CH3(NO2)2

1

2

135

Dioxathion

C12 H26O6P2S4

0.2

-

136

Diquat Dibromide

C12 H12N2.2Br

0.5

1

137

1,4-Dioxane

OCH2CH2OCH2CH2

10

-

138

Copper (dust)

Cu

0.5

1

139

Copper (fume)

Cu

0.1

0.2

140

Copper compounds

Cu

0.5

1

141

Endousulfan

C9H6Cl6O3S

0.1

0.3

142

2, 3 - Epoxy 1 - propanol

C3H6O2

1

5

143

EPN (o - ethyl - o - paranitrophenyl - phosphonothioate)

C18H14NO4PS

0.5

-

144

Ethanolamine

NH2C2H4OH

8

15

145

Diglycidyl ether

C6H10O3

0.5

-

146

Chloroethyl ether

C4H8Cl2O

-

2

147

Chloromethyl ether

(CH2Cl)2O

0.003

0.005

148

Ethyl ether

C2H5OC2H5

1,000

1,500

149

Isopropyl glycidyl ether

(CH3)2CHOCH(CH3)2

200

300

150

Resorcinol monomethyl Ether

C7H8O2

-

5

151

Ethylamine

CH3CH2NH2

18

30

152

Ethylene

C2H4

1,150

-

153

Ethanethiol

(Ethylmercaptan)

C2H5SH

1

3

154

Ethylene dibromide

BrCH2 CH2Br

1

-

155

Ethylene glycol

 

10

20

156

Ethylene glycol

C2H6O2

60

125

157

Ethylene glycol dinitrate

C2H4(O2NO)2

0.3

0.6

158

Ethylene oxide

C2H4O

1

2

159

Perchloroethylene

C2Cl4

70

170

160

Ethylidene norbornene

C9H12

-

20

161

Fensulfothion

C11H17O4PS2

0.1

-

162

Fenthiol

C10H15O3PS2

0.1

-

163

Fluorine

F2

0.2

0.4

164

Fluorides

 

1

2

165

Formaldehyde

HCHO

0.5

1

166

Formamide

HCONH2

15

30

167

Furfural

C4H3OCHO

10

20

168

Furfuryl alcohol

C5H6O2

20

40

169

Coal Tar pitch volatiles

 

-

0.1

170

Halothane

C2HBrClF3

8

24

171

Mekuran (mixture of ethylmer cuirc chloride and lindane)

 

0.005

-

172

Heptachlor (iso)

C10H5Cl7

0.5

1,5

173

Heptan

C7H14

800

1,250

174

Hexachlorobenzene

C6Cl6

0.5

0.9

175

Hexachloro 1,3-butadiene

C4Cl6

-

0.005

176

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 - hexachloro-cyclohexane

C6H6Cl6

0.5

-

177

Hexachlorocyclopen-tadiene

C5Cl6

0.01

0.1

178

Hexafluoroacetone

(CF3)2CO

0.5

0.7

179

Hexafluoropropene

C6F6

-

5

180

n - Hexane

C6H6

90

180

181

Hyrazine

H4N2

0.05

0.1

182

Hydrocarbons (1 - 10 C)

 

-

300

183

Hydrogen fluoride

HF

0.1

0.5

184

Hydrogen phosphide

H3P

0.1

0.2

185

Hydrogen selenide

H2Se

0.03

0.1

186

Hydrogene sulfide

H2S

10

15

187

Hydrogen cyanide

HCN

0.3

0.6

188

Hydroxydes (alkaline) (Alkali hydroxide)

 

0.5

1

189

Hydroquinone ( 1,4 - Dihydroxybenzene)

C6H6O2

0.5

1.5

190

Iodomethane

CH3I

1

2

191

Iodoform

CHI3

3

10

192

Iodine

I2

1

2

193

Isopropyl glycidyl ether

(CH3)2C2H2O(CH3)2

240

360

194

Isopropyl nitrate

C3H7NO2

20

40

195

Potassium cyanide

KCN

5

10

196

Welding fumes

 

5

-

197

Petroleum gas (liquefied)

 

1800

2250

198

Zinc chloride

ZnCl2

1

2

199

Zinc Chromate

CrO4Zn

0.01

0.03

200

Zinc fluoride

F2Zn

0.2

1

201

Zinc oxide (dust, fume)

ZnO

5

10

202

Zinc phosphide

P2Zn3

-

0.1

203

Zinc stearate (inhalable dust)

Zn(C18H35O2)2

10

20

204

Zinc stearate (respirable dust)

Zn(C18H35O2)2

5

-

205

Zinc sulfide

ZnS

-

5

206

Camphor

C10H16O

2

6

207

Magnesium oxide

MgO

5

10

208

Malathion

C10H19O6PS2

5

-

209

Manganese and compounds

Mn

0.3

0.6

210

Methallyl chloride

C4H7Cl

-

0.3

211

Methane thiol

CH4S

1

2

212

Methoxychlor

Cl3CCH(C6H4OCH3)2

10

20

213

Methyl acrylate

CH2CHCOOCH3

20

40

214

Metyl  acrylonitrile

CH2C(CH3)CN

3

9

215

2 - Methyl aziridine

C8H16N2O7

5

-

216

Methylamine

CH5N

5

24

217

Methyl acetate

CH3COOCH3

100

250

218

Methyl ethyl keton

C4H8O

150

300

219

2 - Methyl furan

C5H6O

-

1

220

Methyl hydrazine

CH3NHNH2

0.08

0.35

221

Methyl mercaptan

CH3SH

1

2

222

Methyl methacrylate

CH2C(CH3)COOCH3

50

150

223

Methyl silicate

C4H12O4Si

-

6

224

Mevinphos

C7H13O6Pi

0.1

0.3

225

Monocrotophos

C7H14NO5P

0.25

-

226

Ferric salt (as Fe)

 

1

2

227

Carbon black

C

3.5

7

228

Naled

(CH3O)2P(O) OCHBrCBrCl2

3

6

229

Naphthalene

C10H8

40

75

230

Chlorinated naphthalenes

 

0.2

0.6

231

Sodium bisulfite

NaHSO3

5

-

232

Sodium borate

Na2B4O7

1

-

233

Sodium cyanide

NaCN

5

10

234

Sodium fluoroacetate

FCH2COONa

0.05

0.1

235

Sodium metabisulfite (Disodium pyrosulfite)

Na2S2O5

5

-

236

Sodium azide

NaN3

0.2

0.3

237

Neoprene

C4H5Cl

10

30

238

Aluminum and compounds

Al

2

4

239

Nicotine

C10H14N2

0.5

1

240

Nickel and compounds (soluble)

Ni

0.05

0.25

241

Nickel monoxide

NiO, Ni2O3

0.1

-

242

Nickel carbonyl

C4NiO4

0.01

0.02

243

Nitrogen dioxide

NO2 và N2O4

5

10

244

Nitrogen monoxide

NO

10

20

245

Nitrogene trifluoride

NF3

30

45

246

Nitrobenzene

C6H5NO2

3

6

247

1- Nitrobutane

CH3(CH2)3NO2

-

30

248

Nitro ethane

C2H5NO

30

-

249

Nitromethane

CH3NO2

30

-

250

1-Nitropropane

CH3(CH2)2NO2

30

60

251

Nitrotoluene

CH3C6H4NO2

11

22

252

Glycerol trinitrate (Nitroglycerine)

CH2NO3CHNO3CH2NO3 [C3H5(NO3)3]

0.5

1

253

2-Nitropropane

CH3(CH2)2NO2

18

-

254

Octane

C10H22

900

1,400

255

Osmium tetroxide

OsO4

0.002

0.003

256

Ozone

O3

0.1

0.2

257

Paraquat

(CH3(C5H4N)2CH3).2Cl

0.1

0.3

258

Parathion

(C2H5O)2PSOC6H4NO2

0.05

0.1

259

Pentaborane

B5H9

0.01

0.02

260

Pentachlorophenol

C6Cl5OH

0.2

0.4

261

Perchloryl fluoride

ClO3F

14

25

262

Phenol

C6H5OH

4

8

263

Phenyl hydrazine

C6H5 NHNH2

1

2

264

Phenyl isocxyanate

C7H5NO

0.02

0.05

265

Phenylene diamine

C6H8N2

0.1

0.2

266

Phenyl phosphine

C6H7P

-

0.25

267

Phorate

(C2H5O)2P(S)SCH2S-C2H5

0.05

0.2

268

Phosgene

COCl2

0.2

0.4

269

Phosphine

PH3

0.1

0.2

270

Phosphorus(White, yellow)

P4

0.03

0.1

271

Phosphoruos oxy chloride

POCl3

0.6

1.2

272

Phosphorus trichloride

PCl3

1

2

273

Phosphorous pentachloride

PCl5

1

2

274

Picloram (iso)

 

10

20

275

Propoxur

CH3NHCOOC6H4OCH(CH3)2

0.5

1.5

276

n-Propylacetat

CH3COOCH2CH2CH3

200

600

277

-Propiolactone

C3H4O2

1

2

278

Propylenimine

C37N

-

5

279

Pyrenthrin

C21H28O3

5

10

280

Pyridine

C5H5N

5

10

281

Quinone

C6H4O2

0.4

12

282

Resorcinol (1,3 - Dihydroxybenze)

C6H6O2

45

90

283

Allyl alcohol

CH2CHCH2OH

3

6

284

Ethanol

CH3(CH­2)OH

1,000

3,000

285

Furful alcohol

C5H6O2

20

40

286

Methanol

CH3OH

50

100

287

n - Amyl alcohol

CH3(CH2)4OH

100

200

288

Propanol

CH3(CH2)2OH

350

600

289

Propargyl alcohol

HCCCH2OH

2

6

290

Rotenone (Derris)

C23H22O6

5

10

291

Paraffin wax

 

1

6

292

Ferric oxide (dust, fume)

Fe2O3

5

10

293

Iron carbonyl

C5FeO­5

0.08

0.1

294

Selenium and compounds

Se

0.1

1

295

Selenium dioxide

O2Se

-

0.1

296

Stibine

SbH3

0.2

0.4

297

Strychnine

C21H222O2

0.15

0.3

298

Selenium hexafluoride

SeF6

0.2

-

299

Silane

H2Si

0.7

1.5

300

Stearates

 

10

-

301

Styrene

C6H5CH CH2

85

420

302

Sulfur chloride

S2Cl2

5

10

303

Sulfur dioxide

SO2

5

10

304

Sunfuryl fluoride

F2SO­2

20

40

305

Sulfur tetrafluoride

SF4

0.4

1

306

Tellurium

Te

0.01

-

307

Tellurium hexafluoride

F6Te

0.1

-

308

Tetrachloroethylene

C2CL4

60

-

309

1,1,7,7 Tetrachloroheptane

C7H12Cl4

-

1

310

Tetraethyl pyrophosphate

C8H20O7P2

0.05

0.2

311

Tetralin

C10 H12

100

300

312

Tetramethyl succinonitrile

(CH3)2C2(CN)2(CH3)2

3

6

313

Tetranitromethane

CH3(NO2)4

8

24

314

Tin (organic)

Sn

0.1

0.2

315

Tin (inorganic)

Sn

1

2

316

Tin oxide

SnO2

2

-

317

Thionyl Chloride

Cl2OS

5

-

318

Benzenethiol

C6H6S

2

-

319

Mercury compounds (organic)

Hg

0.01

0.03

320

Titanium

Ti

10

-

321

Thiram

(CH3)2 (SCSN)2 (CH3)2

5

10

322

Tobacco (dust)

 

2

5

323

Mercury and compounds (inorganic)

Hg

0.02

0.04

324

Titanium dioxide (respirable dust)

TiO2

5

-

325

Titanium dioxide (inhalable dust)

TiO2

6

10

326

Toluene

C6H5CH3

100

300

327

Toluene diisocyanate

C9H6N2O2

0.04

0.07

328

 (m-, o-, p-) Toluidine

CH3C6H4NH2

0.5

1

329

Tribromometan

CHBr3

5

15

330

Tributyl phosphate

C12H27O4P

2.5

5

331

Trichloroethane

C2H3Cl3

10

20

332

Trichloroethylene

C2HCl3

20

40

333

Trinitrobenzene

C6H3(NO2)3

-

1.0

334

Trichloro nitrobenzene

C6H2Cl3NO2

-

1.0

335

2, 4, 6 - Trinitrotoluene

CH3C6H2(NO2)3

0.1

0.2

336

Tritolyl phosphate

C21H21O4P

0.1

0.2

337

Uranium and compounds

U

0.2

-

338

Vanadium penta oxide

V2O5

0.05

0.1

339

Vanadium

V

0.5

1.5

340

Vinyl acetate

CH2CHOOCCH3

10

30

341

Vinyl bromide

CH2CBr

20

40

342

Vinyl chloride

C2H3Cl

1

5

343

Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide (930)

C8H12O2

60

120

344

Warfarine

C19H16O4

0.1

0.2

345

Wofatox

C8H10NO5PS

0.1

0.2

346

Petrol (Petrol distillates, gazonline)

 

300

-

347

Cellulose (inhalable dust)

 

10

20

348

Cellulose (respirable dust)

 

5

-

349

Cesium hydroxide

CsOH

2

-

350

Cyanogene

NCCN

4

20

351

Xyanogene chloride

ClCN

0.3

0.6

352

Cyanides

CN(K, Na)

0.3

0.6

353

Cyclohexane

C6H12

500

1,000

354

Cychlohexanol

C6H11OH

100

200

355

Xylene

C6H4(CH3)2

100

300

356

Xylidine

(CH­3)2C6H3NH2

5

10

Part 2:

 FIVE (05) PRINCIPLES AND SEVEN (07) MEASUREMENTS OF LABOR HYGIENE

I. PRINCIPLE 1 – ERGONOMIC DESIGN OF LABOR SYSTEMS

1. Scope of regulation

The ergonomic principles for designing labor systems in order to create optimum work conditions, ensure the safety, comfort and human health, technical and economic efficiency.

2. Subjects of application: the labor systems in facilities that employ workers (production facilities, business establishments, offices…)

3. Definition:

The terms in these principles are construed as follows:

3.1. Working facilities: are every production facilities, business establishments, offices…

3.2. Labor system: including humans and labor equipment, working together during the work process, performing the labor duties at working areas, in labor environment under the compulsory conditions of the labor duties.

3.3. Labor duty: is an expected result of the labor system.

3.4. Labor equipment: tools, machinery, vehicles and other machinery, devices or components used in the labor system.

3.5. The labor process: the continuation in time and space of the mutual impacts of humans, labor equipment, materials, energy and information within the labor system.

3.6. Labor space: the acceptable capacity for one or many people in the labor system to fulfill the labor duty.

3.7. The labor environment: the cultural, social, biological, chemical and physical factors around a person within his/her working space.

3.8. Labor stress (or external burden): every labor condition and external requirement for the labor system that negatively affect the human psychology and/or physiology.

3.9. Labor anxiety (or internal reaction): are impacts of labor stress on a person depending on his/her personal characteristics and abilities.

3.10. Labor fatigue:

Are systemic or partial non-pathological manifestation of fatigue due to the labor anxiety that may totally be recovered after some rest.

4. General principles

4.1. Working space design and labor equipment

a. Designs related to the body sizes:

The designs of the working space and equipment must depend on the human body sizes and the labor process. The working space must be adapted to the workers.

b. Posture:

- The worker may alternate between standing and sitting postures. If the worker must choose one, the sitting posture is usually preferred. The standing posture may be required depending on the work process.

- The postures must not cause labor fatigue due to extensive static muscular tension. The postures are interchangeable.

c. Muscle endurance:

- The requirement of muscle strength must be compatible to the worker’s physical condition.

- The muscle groups must be strong enough to satisfy the physical requirements. If the physical requirements are overwhelming, the supportive energy sources must be supplemented during the labor process.

- The extensive static tension of a muscle group must be avoided

d. The body movements:

- The movements must be balanced. The movement is more preferred than extensive static positions.

- The movement that require high precision must not demand considerable muscle strain.

- The movement must be made and combined easily using compatible control equipment.

e. The signs, monitors and control panel.

- The signals and monitors must be selected, designed and set up appropriately for the human sensory features, in particular:

+ The features and quantity of the signals and monitors must be appropriate for the information characteristics.

+ For clear information reception in places with many monitors, the monitors must be placed in order to achieve clear, firm and quick orientation. They might be arranged by function or technical process or importance and use frequency of special information.

+ The features and designs of signals and monitors must ensure clear recognition. These are applicable to danger signals.

+ The extensive activities in which the observation and supervision prevail, the overloading or underloading impacts must be avoided by designing and arranging the signals and monitors.

f. Control panels:

- Kinds, designs and arrangement of the control panels corresponding to the control are carried out depending on the human characteristics including natural and conditioned reflexes.

- The movement or static position of the control panel must be chosen depending on the control, the anthropometry and biomechanics.

- The functions of control panels must be recognizable.

- If there are multiple control panels at the same place, they must be clearly set up in order to ensure safe and quick operation. This may be carried out similarly to that of the signals by grouping by functions of the process in which they are used etc.

- The emergency control panel must be safely covered in order to avoid accidental activation.

4.2. Labor environment designs

Depending on the labor system, the following measurement must be noticed:

- The workshop sizes (general layout, working space and traveling space) must be reasonable.

- The clean air must be regulated depending on the following factors:

+ The quantity of people in a room,

+ The demand for manual labor,

+ The workshop size (including the labor equipment)

+ The emission of pollutants in a room,

+ The thermal conditions

- The light must be sufficient

The lighting must ensure optimum visions for the required activities.  The following measurements must be noticed:

+ The luminance.

+ The colors.

+ The light distribution.

+ The unwanted reflection and glare.

+ The contrast between the color and the reflection.

+ The worker age.

- The room and labor equipment colors must be selected depending on their impacts on the reflection distribution, the structure and quality of the field of view, the safety color perception.

- The negative or irritable impacts of noise, including the noise from external sources in auditory work areas must be prevented.

- The vibration and impacts on humans must not exceed the limit in order to avoid physical harm, physiological reaction, sickness or sensorimotor disorder.

- The exposure of the workers to dangerous material and hazardous radiation must be avoided.

- For outdoor works, the workers must be appropriately protected from negative impacts of the climate, e.g. cold, heat, wind, rain resistance etc.

4.3. Labor process designs

- The labor process must be designed in order to protect human health and safety, create comfort and ease the jobs, especially by avoid overload and underload. The overload and underload due to crossing the upper and lower limit of the mental and physical function scale. For example:

+ The physical burden and sensory burden that cause fatigue.

+ The underload burden or labor monotony may reduce vigilance.

- Apart from the above factor, the mental and physical stress also depend on the contents and the recurrence of the tasks and the control of humans throughout the work process.

- Taking measures for improving the work process quality. For example:

+ Only one worker performs a number of consecutive tasks of the same work instead of a few workers (work extension).

+ Only one worker performs a number of consecutive tasks of the different works instead of a few workers (work variety).

+ Changing works. For example: alternating the voluntary works among the workers on the same assembly line or in one autonomous team.

+ Organized or unorganized breaks.

- During the implementation of the above measures, it is required to pay attention to:

+ The change in the insomnia and the work ability in day and night.

+ The difference in work ability among the workers and the variance in ages.

+ The personal abilities.

II. PRINCIPLE 2 – ERGONOMIC DESIGN OF WORKING LOCATIONS

1. Scope of regulation

The ergonomic principles for designing working positions in every business line in order to create optimum work conditions, ensure the safety, comfort and human health, technical and economic efficiency.

2. Subjects of application: every working position

3. Definition:

The terms in these principles are construed as follows:

- Working position: is a space where the technical equipment is equipped for one person or a group of people to work on a job or a phase.

- The reaching zone of the motion range is part of the working position, limited by the arc created by a stretched arm’s movement around the shoulder joint.

- The easy reaching zone of the motion range is part of the working position, limited by the arc created by a stretch arm’s movement around the shoulder joint (where the control equipment is regularly used).

- The optimum reaching zone of motion range is part of the working position, limited by the arc created by a stretch arm’s movement around the elbow joint (where the control equipment is always used).

4. General principles of ergonomics

- The working position must be adapted to each kind of work, to the ability, to the mental and physical characteristics of the worker.

- The working position must be designed on the basis of the analysis of the human work process with particular equipment, basing on the anthropometrical measurements, the mental and physical characteristics of the worker and the assessment of hygienic conditions of the work.

- The working area arrangement includes: calculating the sizes basing on the anthropometrical measurements, selecting the appropriate working zone, surface, comfortable working posture and reasonably designing, arranging the equipment.

- The machinery and equipment must be suitable for the mental and physical characteristics of the worker (especially the anthropometrical and biomechanical characteristics).

- Arranging labor in the production premises in an optimum way including safe and adequate passages.

- The light (artificial or natural) must be sufficient for both ordinary works and machinery maintenance.

- The noise and vibration from the working positions or other sources must not exceed the acceptable standards.

- The necessary measures for protecting workers from the impact of dangerous and toxic factors (physical, chemical, biological, psychological and physiological factors) during the production must be taken.

- The measures for preventing and reducing workers’ fatigue, psychological stress and other negative impacts must be taken.

5. Principles for working position arrangement:

- The working location arrangement must ensure that the task is performed within the accessible zone of the motion range.

- There are 3 kinds of accessible zones of the motion range.

* Reaching zone

* Easy reaching zone

* Optimum reaching zone

- The space for legs and feet while sitting must be sufficient.

- The requirements for the vision from the working location must be satisfied.

- The information display zones must be optimized (display devices, signboards, signals…) for the worker to receive information efficiently.

- The height of working surfaces, the distance from eyes to the observed objects, the view angle, footrest space must be sufficient.

- The size and height of the chair must be convenient for changing the working posture. The chair must not be to deep. The distance from the chair surface to the table surface must not be lower than 270 - 300mm.

III. PRINCIPLE 3 – ERGONOMIC DESIGN OF MACHINERY AND TOOLS

1. Scope of application

The ergonomic principles for designing machinery and tools in every business line is to design optimum machinery and tools in order to ensure the safety, comfort and human health, technical and economic efficiency.

2. Subjects of application: every working machinery and tools.

3. The principles

- Depending on the variance in body size when systemically or partially move the body.

- Depending on the motion range of the joints. The comfortable angles of the body.

- Depending on the required forces on the control devices.

- The principle of movement limitation in order to ensure comfortable postures and optimum working zones.

- The requirements for hygiene and appearance (shape, paint color…) must be satisfied.

- The principle of using anthropometry figures: after using the tools, the subject shall select the anthropometry figures as the basis for calculating the sizes of machinery and tools, the percentage of people that concur with the tool and machinery design.

IV. MEASUREMENT 4 – HEIGHT OF WORK SURFACES

1. Scope of regulation: principles of work surface height design.

2. Subjects of application: every working position

3. The principles

 

Work characteristics

Height of working zone

1

2

3

4

5

Works that demand precise observation

Works that need handwork

Works that need free hand movement

Works with heavy material (for standing position only)

Works with various demands

10 - 20 cm above the elbow

5 - 7cm above the elbow

Slightly under the elbow

10 - 30cm under the elbow

Determined by the work that demands the most

V. PRINCIPLE 5 – WORKING POSITIONS WITH COMPUTERS

1. Scope of application: the basic principles of designing working positions with computers.

2. Subjects of application: every working positions with desktop computer.

3. The principles

3.1. Working positions

- The working position must be designed suitably for the worker. Ideally the position should be adjusted to suit each worker. In case the position cannot be adjusted, the design must be based on the anthropometry (5% and 95%).

- The adjustable working surface height should range from 65 - 75cm. If the height is not adjustable: 70 cm

- The height of the monitor and keyboard must be independently adjustable.

- The minimum distance between two workers is 1m (from the center of the working position).

3.2. Working surface:

- The working surface must not be glaring and reflective, and must be spacious enough to place necessary stuff such as the keyboard, mouse and document for the worker’s comfort.

- The document holder (if any) must be firm and placed at positions that do not cause the user to make inconvenient head and eye movements.

- If the use of computers is primary, it must be placed in front of the operator. If the use of computers is secondary, it must be placed on the left, if the operator is right-handed and vice versa.

3.3. Chair and backrest:

- The chair height must be adjustable from 35-50 cm and rotatable.

- The chair must be firm. The chair must not be covered by synthetic waterproof material.

- The seat depth is 38- 43 cm, at least 45 cm in width, edgeless. The tilt being 0 - 100 that can handle the body weight on the buttock (not on the thigh).

- The performance on the keyboard must not be hindered when the arm is rested.

- For mobile chairs, the 5 castors must be fixed on the chair.

- The backrest must be adjustable that can handle the back (hip).

3.4. Footrest:

- There must be space for the operator’s feet to be comfortable.

- The overly tall chairs must have footrests. The tilt angle of the footrest is approximately 300 with non-slip surface.

3.5. The operator’s posture:

- The operator must sit comfortably with the back rested and feet on the floor or the footrest. The elbow angle is approximately 900, the angle between the body and the thigh is from 90-1200.

- The operator should avoid rigid sitting posture for a long time but may change the position, stand, stretch or walk around if feel tired.

3.6. View angle and visions:

- The best view angle is between 10-300 below the horizontal line of sight of the operator. The upper side of the monitor must not be higher than the eye-level. The angle between the ray from the lower side of the monitor and the horizontal line of sight must not exceed 400.

- The appropriate vision is not shorter than 50 cm.

3.7. Glare prevention and lighting

- The general light intensity: 300 - 700 lux For places with special visual requirements, the intensity may reach 700 - 1,000 lux. Partial lighting might be used for document reading with lampshade for glare prevention.

- Diminishing the reflection and glare by properly placing the light sources, not using reflective surfaces and items...

- Paying attention to the light sources when arranging computers so that the monitor would not reflect the light. Arranging computer so that the window does not face the monitor or its back. The computers should be placed at intersections of the light sources overhead rather than right below them.

- The monitor must be covered with anti-glare coat. If the anti-glare coat is not available, the monitor must be equipped with anti-reflection equipment in order to prevent glare from reflection. Such equipment must not reduce the definition of graphics and text. Only use the anti-glare filter when other solutions are not available.

- The wall color must be elegant with low reflection level (non-glossy). The colors of surrounding equipment must also be non-glossy or dark in order to avoid reflection of light sources. Avoid using reflective, shimmering or glossy surfaces at workplaces.

3.8. Environment

- The working room temperature is from 23 - 250C, the maximum relative humidity is 75%.

- The minimum ventilation volume is 13 m3/hour/person. The wind speed must not exceed 0.5 m/second.

- The noise must not exceed 55 dBA.

3.9. Breaks

- After every hour of continuous work with computer, a short break to rest or doing light works not related to the monitor is recommended It is best to leave the computer during this time.

- It is better to exercise the muscles or eyes during this time.

- This time is not included in the break time.

VI.  V. MEASUREMENT 1 – WORKING POSITIONS WITH COMPUTERS

1. Scope of application

The basic measurements of designing working positions with computers basing on the basic principles stated above.

2. Subjects of application: the working positions with desktop computer.

3. Measurements

No.

Norm

Size

1

Table, chair, posture

Table height: - Adjustable (cm)

- Non-adjustable (cm)

- Chair height (adjustable) (cm)

Seat depth (cm)

Minimum seat width (cm)

Seat slope toward the backrest (degree)

Footrest space (cm)

Footrest slop (degree)

Elbow angle (degree)

Body – thigh angle (degree)

View angle (below the horizontal line of sight) (degree)

Vision (cm)

 

65 - 70

70

35 - 50

38 - 43

45

0 - 10

19

30

85 - 95

90 - 120

10 - 30

>50

2

Environment

- General lighting (lux): - normal

- Special visual requirements

- Temperature (0C)

- Maximum humidity (%)

- Minimum ventilation

- Wind speed(m/second)

- Noise (dBA)

 

300 -700

700-  1,000

23 - 25

75

13 m3/hour/person

Not exceeding 0.5

Not exceeding 55

3

Continuous working time

1-2 hours

VII. MEASUREMENTS 2- – HEIGHT OF WORKING SURFACES

1. Scope of regulation

basic measurements of working surface height.

2. Subjects of application: working positions.

3. Measurements:

Posture

Kind of work

Height of working surface (cm)

Male

Female

Male and female

Standing

Light

88 - 102

85 - 97

86 - 99

Medium

80 - 94

77 - 89

78 - 91

Heavy

74 - 88

71 - 83

72 - 85

Sitting

High precision

73 - 86

70 - 83

70 - 83

Precision

65 - 78

62 - 75

64 - 77

Light works without high precision

60 - 73

57 - 70

59 - 72

VIII. MEASUREMENTS 3 – VIEW DISTANCE FROM EYES TO THINGS

1. Scope of regulation

The measurements of view distance from eyes to the working objects.

2. Subjects of application: working positions

3. Measurements

No.

Work characteristic

View distance

(from eyes to things)

1

2

3

4

Works demanding extreme precisions (small part assembly…)

Works demanding high precision (drawing, sewing, seaming…)

Works demanding precision and medium precision (reading, lathe…)

Works demanding little precision

12 - 25cm

25 - 35cm

35 - 50cm

Over 50cm

IX. MEASUREMENTS 2 – VIEW ANGLE

1. Scope of regulation

The measurements of view angle in working position design in order to create comfort and productivity.

2. Subjects of application: working positions.

3. The measurement of view angle with the horizontal line of sight  00

No.

Working posture

View angle

1

 

2

Leaning backward

(e.g. working in control rooms)

Leaning forward

(e.g. – working at tables)

150

 

450

* One side of a view angle is the horizontal line of sight.

* The object of work under regular observation must be put at the front center field of view

X. SPECIFICATONS 5 – FOOTREST SPACE

1. Scope of regulation

The measurements of footrest space in working position design in order to create comfort and productivity.

2. Subjects of application: working positions.

3. Measurements:

No.

Working posture

Footrest space

1

 

 

 

2

 

 

3

Sitting positions:

Width

Depth at knee-level

Depth at floor-level

Standing positions:

Depth for feet

Height for feet

The free space behind the standing worker

 

60 cm

 45

65

 

 15 cm

 15 cm

90 cm

XI. MEASUREMENTS 6 – LIFTING HEIGHT

1. Scope of regulation

The measurements of height from the floor to the person lifting in order to create comfort and avoid vocational risks.

2. Subjects of application: the workers that lift heavy things.

3. Definition`

The terms in these standards are construed as follows:

- Normal lifting height: within the range from the elbow joint to the shoulder joint.

- Low lifting height: under the elbow joint.

4. Measurements

Level

Normal lifting height

Low lifting height

Distance to the handle (cm)

Distance to the handle (cm)

< 30

30-50

50-70

>70

< 30

30-50

50-70

>70

Lifting weight (kg)

Lifting weight (kg)

1

Heavy things easily lifted by machines

2

< 18

< 10

< 8

< 5

< 13

< 8

< 5

< 4

3

18-34

10-19

8-13

6-11

13-23

8-13

5-9

4-7

4

35-55

20-30

14-21

12-28

24-25

14-21

10-15

8-13

5

>55

>30

21

>18

>35

>21

>15

>8

XII. MEASUREMENTS 7: PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS OF THERMAL STRAIN – LIMIT VALUES

1. Scope of regulation: The limit values of physiological measurements of thermal strain including the risks to health of healthy workers, the adaptability to different technologies to detect such risks.

2. Subjects of application: workers at every facility working in hot or cold environment.

3. Reference standard: ISO 9886

4. Physiological specifications of thermal strain

4.1. Body core temperature

The body core temperature must not differ from the values in section 4.1.1 and 4.1.2.

4.1.1. Hot environment

The limit values depend on the core temperature increase and the used measurements.

The core temperature must not increase more than 10C (or not exceed 380C) in the following cases;

- The core temperature is taken many times, regardless of the techniques.

- When other physiological measurements are not taken.

In other conditions, especially when the esophagus temperature is continuously monitored concurrently with the heart rate, the limit may be raised such as increasing 1.40C or reaching 38.50C.

The increase of temperature over 38.50C might be tolerable when the following conditions are satisfied:

a. The subject has been given medical examination.

b. The subject has adapted to the heat by repeatedly exposing to such environment when performing special duties.

c. Under constant medical supervision and means of first-aid are ready.

d. The esophagus temperature is continuously monitored.

e. Other physiological measurements are concurrently monitored – especially the heart rate

f. The exposure might be immediately suspended when the intolerable symptoms appear such as fatigue, vertigo, nausea

g. The workers are entitled to leave the workplace when they want.

The core temperature must not exceed 390C.

4.1.2. Cold  environment:

In cold environments, only the measurements of esophagus temperature (tes), rectum temperaturer (tre) and abdomen temperature are suitable. The lower limit for these temperatures is 360C. Conditions of application:

a. When these temperatures are monitored from time to time.

b. When the exposure is repeated in a day.

c. In some rare conditions, the lower temperature might be tolerable briefly.

d. The subject has been given medical examination

e. The skin temperature is concurrently monitored and the acceptable limit is noticed.

f. The workers are entitled to leave the workplace when they want.

4.2. The skin temperature limit values:

For the previously mentioned reasons, the below limits are only related to the pain threshold.

In hot environments, the maximum partial skin temperature is 400C. In cold environments: 200C for forehead skin, 100C for limb tip temperature (especially finger tips and toe tips).

4.3. Heart rate (HR):

The heart rate increase (HRT) by thermal strain is 33 beats for each degree increased of the core temperature. However, the heart reaction to heat varies from person to person. Therefore, in case the HR is the only physiological measurement monitored, the upper limit of HRT  around 30 beats/minute would be reasonable. In circumstances that the thermal strain might be high, it must be measured simultaneously with the core temperature. Moreover, there must be means to monitor the actual heart rate throughout the exposure.

The limited heart rate at workplaces must not exceed the maximum limit minus 20 beats/minute. Ideally, these values should be calculated by personal test. If such test cannot be carried out, the values could be approximated using the following formula:

HRL  0.85 A (A is the age in year).

According to the maximum limit of the core temperature being 390C, the maximum limit of the heart rate increase from the initial temperature may reach 60 beat/minute. This may be applicable to the similar situations, especially under medical supervision and constant monitoring.

4.4. Weight loss:

The limit value of weight loss is 800g for adapted workers and 1300g for unadapted ones, proportionally to the water loss being 3250g or 5200g in case the water intake is 75% of the water loss.

These values refer to subjects with 1.8 m2 of skin and may be applicable to a particular subject by proportionally multiplied the skin area ADu with the reference skin area being 1.8 m2

Limit values

Unadapted person

Adapted person

Caution

Danger

Caution

Danger

Sweat level

Idle: M<65W/m2

        SWmax W/m2

                    g/hour

Working: M>65W/m2

       SWmax W/m2

                   g/hour

 

 

100

250

 

200

520

 

 

150

390

 

250

650

 

 

200

520

 

300

780

 

 

300

780

 

400

1040

Maximum water loss

           DmaxW.h/m2

                    g

 

1 000

2 600

 

1 250

3 250

 

1 500

3 900

 

2 000

5 200

Notes: W  watt-hour  hour g  gram

Notes:   * M  energy metabolism level

             * SW sweat weight

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1: Twenty one (21) standards of labor hygiene  

I. Standards of hygienic amenities

II. Standards of hygienic distance

III. Manual labor – Standards of task classification by energy consumption classification

IV. Manual labor – Standards of task classification by heart rate

V. Carrying standard – Limited weight

VI. Lighting standards

VII. Microclimate standards

VIII. Standards of silicon dust

IX. Standards of non-silicon dust

X. Standards of cotton dust

XI. Standards of asbestos dust

XII. Standards of noise

XIII. Standards of vibration

XIV. Standards of static magnetic field - Magnetic flux density

XV. Standards of low-frequency magnetic field - magnetic flux density

XVI. Standards of intensity of low-frequency electromagnetic field and static electric field

XVII. Standards of intensity of electromagnetic field from 30kHz - 300GHz

XVIII. Ultraviolet radiation – Acceptable limit

XIX. Standards of radioactivity

XX. X-ray radiation – Acceptable limit

XXI. Chemicals – Acceptable limit in the working air

Part 2: Five (05) principles and seven (07) measurements of labor hygiene

I. Principle 1 – Ergonomic design of labor systems

II. Principle 2 – Ergonomic design of labor positions

III. Principle 3 – Ergonomic design of machinery and tools

IV. Principle 4 – Working area layout

V. Principle 5 – Working position with computers

VI. Measurement 1 – Working position with computers

VII. Measurement 2 – Height of work surfaces

VIII. Measurement 3 – Distance from eyes to things

IX. Measurement 4 - View angle

X. Measurement 5 – Footrest

XI. Measurement 6 – Lifting height

XII. Measurement 7 – Physiological measurement of thermal strain - Limit values

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Thuộc tính Văn bản pháp luật 3733/2002/QD-BYT

Loại văn bảnQuyết định
Số hiệu3733/2002/QD-BYT
Cơ quan ban hành
Người ký
Ngày ban hành10/10/2002
Ngày hiệu lực25/10/2002
Ngày công báo...
Số công báo
Lĩnh vựcThể thao - Y tế
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Lược đồ Decision No. 3733/2002/QD-BYT promulgating 21 labor hygiene standards


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